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malintZine Suggested Reading List (to be decent)

This list is probably going to grow (ALOT)- please feel free to comment and add your ideas for recommended reading or send your suggestions to malintzine@gmail.com

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities – Ching-In Chen (Editor), Jai Dulani (Editor), and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Editor); Andrea Smith (preface)

Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide – Andrea Smith

Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism – Daisy Hernandez

Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center by bell hooks

Loose Woman: Poems – Sandra Cisneros

Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities John D’Emilio

Crip Theory Robert McRuer

The House on Mango Street – Sandra Cisneros

Reading Chican@ Like a Queer – Sandra Soto

This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color – Cherie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua

This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation – Gloria Anzaldúa and AnaLouise Keating.

Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza – Gloria Anzaldua

Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches – Audre Lorde

The Black Unicorn: Poems – Audre Lorde

¡Chicana Power!: Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement – Maylei Blackwell

A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000–2010 – Cherie Moraga

Desert Blood: The Juarez Murders – Alicia Gaspar de Alba

Chicana Feminist Thought: The Basic Historical Writings – Alma M. Garcia

Chicana Falsa and How to be a Chicana Role Model – Michelle Serros

Women, Race and Class – Angela Davis

Living Chicana Theory  Carla Trujillo

Butterfly Boy: Memories of a Chicano Mariposa Rigoberto Gonzalez

Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States  Joey L. Mogul, Andrea J. Ritchie, Kay Whitlock

MARIPOSAS: A Modern Anthology of Queer Latino Poetry  Emanuel Xavier

For Colored Boys Who Speak Softly Yosimar Reyes

Before Night Falls: A Memoir Reinaldo Arenas

Tragic Bitches: An Experiment in Queer Performance Adelina Anthony and Lorenzo Herrera

Trans Liberation: Beyond Pink or Blue  Leslie Feinburg

Virgins, Guerrillas, and Locas: Gay Latinos Writing about Love Jaime Cortez

Chicana Lesbians: The Girls Our Mothers Warned Us About Carla Trujillo

Chulito: A Novel Charles Rice-Gonzalez

Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader Michael Hames-Garcia

Sexuality and Socialism: History, Politics, and Theory of LGBT Liberation Sherry Wolf

Blues Legacies and Black Feminism – Angela Davis

Methodology of the Oppressed – Chela Sandoval

The Decolonial Imaginary – Emma Perez

Infinite Divisions: An Anthology of Chicana Literature – Tey Diana Rebolledo and Eliana S. Rivero

Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity – Chandra Mohanty

Arab & Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, & Belonging – Rabab Abdulhadi, Evelyn Alsultany, and Nadine Naber.

A fat girl’s guide to life – Wendy Shanker

Pedagogies of Crossing: meditations on feminism, sexual politics, memory, and the sacred – Jacqui Alexander

Racial Formation in the United States – Michael Omi and Howard Winant

Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures – Jacqui Alexander and Chandra Mohanty

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980 – Kimberly Springer

The Straight Mind – Monique Wittig

Color of Violence: The Incite! Anthology – INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence

Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment – Patricia Hill Collins

Words of Fire: An Anthology of African-American Feminist Thought – Beverly Guy-Sheftall

Entry Denied: Controlling Sexuality at the Border – Eithne Luibheid

Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law – Dean Spade

The Legacy of Conquest – Patricia Limerick

Race, Reform and Rebellion – Manning Marable

Autobiography of Angela Davis – Angela Davis

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Culture of Silence

Acts of violence are committed against women in the Mexican-American Studies community consistently, yet it seems they are only discussed publicly when people outside the movement get involved. As a young woman in this community I should have been made aware of men in the movement who are known perpetrators of violence. I need to know which spaces are safe spaces and I need to be able to make informed decisions about the people I am involving myself with or organizing with. I believe that part of the reason I had no previous knowledge of any man’s history of gendered violence was because of a carefully constructed culture of silence. This culture of silence is also a culture of protection and of zero accountability. It was created to
pardon perpetrators of gendered violence and shield them from public scrutiny in order to maintain an image of social unity against injustice. The fact that information about people’s history with violence is kept from young women and other community members suggests that there is a system within the MAS community to keep that information private. It suggests that the people in power choose to glorify certain people and hide their history of violence.

Crafting a dialogue or narrative on blogs, newspapers, or during interviews also creates this culture of silence. Every time someone gives an interview or writes an article that intentionally covers up violence and injustice within the community – in order to fake a united, justice oriented front for the rest of the country – they are
contributing to the culture of silence. This is part of a larger issue, one that is centered around Three Sonorans controlling the national dialogue surrounding ethnic studies and vilifying the women or queer identified people who choose to counter this narrative, making the choice every time he writes a post and decides who is the glorified savior and who is the demonized. Bloggers and interviewees make the choice to glorify or vilify whomever they want every time they speak or write a post. They have the power to pick and choose which parts of the present to write about, therefore creating a history – again based on the observations and opinions of men and leaving out certain narratives they believe are unimportant. The assumption is that the narrative of men is all-encompassing and that somehow certain people have the authority to be ‘the voice’ of the movement.

When Three Sonorans writes a post he decides which narrative he wants to perpetuate, one that suits him the best and one that supports his homies, regardless of the truth. People perpetuating narratives for their own personal gain need to take responsibility for their role in establishing the current Tucson narrative as a largely male voice. They also need to take responsibility for their writings glorifying certain men in the community as pillars of social justice around the country, while they knew these men were perpetrators of violence inside their homes and inside the community.

In contrast to this male-centric national ethnic studies narrative, I want to have a collective narrative; filled with stories from women, LGBTQ, and disabled identified peoples. I want the national spotlight to not only focus on the men in this community but to embrace and acknowledge the leadership and contributions of women to this
movement.  In order to create this new narrative there needs to be an end to the public flaming and silencing of women and queer people in the community and there needs to be a system of accountability for our bloggers and those people who try to represent us nationally.

Hopefully this blog can be a tool to shift our national narrative to one that includes voices of people of all genders, sexualities, ages, class status and abilities. We cannot be a movement to fight injustice elsewhere if we are still perpetuating the same patriarchal, colonial oppression within our community.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on January 28, 2013 in Her stories, Tucson movement

 

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“The way I see things, everyone is entitled to their opinion…”

You say “enlightened mujeres” as if that’s a bad thing? And as if that is new…You call out the medium we use to tell our stories yet it is the same medium you use…

You say don’t be outraged if you respond to our “attacks” so in that case don’t be outraged by our response to the vilification of our voices by you.

You are asking us to ignore experiences we’ve had because they involved “brown men” and our stories do not “support MAS”. You are asking us to do the same thing you claim to be against—the silencing of stories. The silencing of herstories/ histories (or are you just against silencing the latter?). Box that shit up because it might make people angry/hurt/ feel oppressed… it’s racist (because against brown men). Who the fuck does that sound like?!

Open your eyes and heart! You’re right about one thing. This is NOT ABOUT YOU or even Sean. This is not personal so please STOP MAKING THIS ABOUT YOU! You are not my savior, nor is Sean. Your stories do not encompass me, save me, or support me.

I realize that I can turn away, not read but the shit you are spouting is public and many around the country take it as truth and OUR story! Many, as I have, know you as someone who “fights for MAS” and wouldn’t do something to hurt our community so your voice must come correct…. But I’m telling you now, that shit is wrong and hurtful. Your shit is fucked up. And NO it is NOT just “las mujeres” (the women who are brave enough to tell their stories even under your heavy vilification…) saying this! There is a reason why not many folks are liking your shit spouting right now…The fact that folks like ‘El Machete Lopez’ can come on a thread of yours supporting your opinion and spout hate speech like ‘lesbians are man haters and can smell testosterone’ and get away w/ that shit w/you is sickening and shows how blind you are to other injustices. You can use us when needed… when it makes MAS look good ‘This is my white friend, my queer friend, my black friend, my woman friend…’ See I don’t hate so and so…I support all people—makes me sad.

I can go on and on but sadly I don’t think you will get it…but I hope you do. At one point at a meeting you apologized for being “divisive’ with the community. YOU ARE DOING IT NOW. PLEASE STOP! Please go read, discuss, examine with an open mind and heart. Go outside those you know who support this rhetoric you are spewing (especially if people who support you are like El Machete…). I write this not asking for a response but for you to take some time to actually examine why you feel the need to write. Is it really to support the community? The whole community? Or to protect your “brown brothers” and which ones? THINK and STOP please until you figure this out….Who really has lost focus? And how can we focus if we are not only being silenced by Pedicone, Horne, and Huppenthal, but by our own community?

 
3 Comments

Posted by on January 21, 2013 in Her stories, Tucson movement

 

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Community New Year’s Resolutions

I was recently reading a list of five New Year’s resolutions for the Latino community by Ernesto Sosa on Huffington Post. The founder and president of the Hispanic Social Media Institute and SOWEB and director at LATISM (Latinos in Innovation, Technology and Social Media), focused on challenges that hold back the Latino community that prevent us from doing what’s needed to “evolve, become a valuable power group and change the outdated, misrepresented Latino stereotypes.”

Sosa has some good points, and some speak volumes to the specific challenges facing Tucson’s own community and should be taken to heart. But it occurred to Ms. Malinche that we could use five additional resolutions to examine our own work that needs to be done in the coming year, particularly the next three months. But let’s throw some love malintZINE’s way – what’s started already knocks two of Sosa’s resolutions off the list – embracing a true culture of collaboration and the productive use of technology (more than 8,000 views since its start).

But there’s more to do, and there’s more for our local community to embrace. If they did, I guarantee the beginning of real change, a change that’s embraced by everyone, not just those in the Chicano community:

  1. Let’s steal the first line in Sosa’s first resolution, “Embrace a true culture of collaboration.” That means creating a movement that truly reaches all areas of the community. malintZINE has offered the community a great start – bringing those who’ve felt disenfranchised by self-described leaders in the fight for Mexican-American studies. malintZINE has provided a way for everyone to no longer be silenced and a path to move all of us forward. But they (we) shouldn’t be alone, more allies and those in the community are needed to understand that an approach that uses bullying and draws lines in the sand no longer works. There needs to be organizing that embraces true collaboration.
  2. In a community movement that embraces collaboration there is no need for the other tactics that have gotten us where we are – using chisme to cause division. When lies come from people seen as trustworthy leaders, it only makes it difficult for many to sift through the lies to get to the facts. Shit, it really makes it difficult for us to use the critical thinking skills we love and embrace. So, for example, if someone were to start whispering that John Pedicone is going to retire this summer and that Auggie Romero is going to be made superintendent, it would make them look only more ridiculous. Or here’s another example, there’s a position in the desegregation proposal that calls for a director of Culturally Relevant Curriculum. Some in the community would like to see Romero, this is true, and others are talking about Norma Gonzalez. The problem here is that nothing has been decided yet, so to act as if that is the case is again, only a tactic to cause division. If Gonzalez is really interested in this position and not feeling peer pressure from her fellow teachers to not apply or push for it, she needs to put herself out there. There’s no need for any whispering. Just get out there and begin an earnest discussion. Let’s begin something collaboratively.
  3. Having clear goals and a clear path to those goals can begin when you work collaboratively and when you don’t use chisme to divide the community (if you need an example of how to do this look to the DREAMers). So, here’s chisme that has yet to be addressed, but needs to be addressed: If former MAS teachers are telling the community that we need to fight for them because they are the MAS program, but they are also telling others they are planning not to return this fall and use Pedicone’s presence in TUSD as their excuse – please, step up and explain what exactly people are fighting for – especially at the desegregation forums in December. Let’s begin with a clear path and goals. UNIDOS’ message to the Tucson Unified School District at the last board meeting asked the board to work with the community and listen as the desegregation process continues. This was a beautiful start and one worth rallying around. In fact, at this point, the teachers could learn a lot from UNIDOS and malintZINE. Let’s leave the bullshit at home, and let’s work together without threats, lies or division.
  4. Yes, it’s true that there are some tactics that can be an important part of the Democratic process in order to make change – while some local politicians are known for using chisme to do just that, and it’s obvious that their example is being replicated, it may also be good to think of the old-fashion sit down – no, it’s not compromise, it’s a damn sit-down. You can even have several. If that doesn’t work, then yes, by all means, bring it on. But bring it on with truth and bring it on with trust – you do that, and the community will have your back. Your bring it on with lies and you bring it on with manipulation, we now see that the result is people will no longer care what you have to say. Instead, the story of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” will continue to be used an example discussed over and over again, as other parts of the community work to do what needs to be done – despite this failed tactic, despite the lies.
  5. Open your eyes to what is going on right now. Before malintZINE was even a reality on the Internet and Twitter-feed, it was no longer a secret that women in the community had enough. Tucson Freedom Summer was just one small experience in several years of feeling silenced and felt-up at the same time. There are those in the community who support MAS and want to create change – but they may be making one mistake. They are stuck on what some will call the “old ways.” Let’s not repeat something that we now know doesn’t work. Why not start something new, something that uses those community organizing tactics we learned from the past, but something that calls for collaboration and truth that also begins with clear goals? You can’t justify the work you want to do by saying your approach is to use the old ways. If there’s any lesson to learn from all of this and the creation of malintZINE, it is that new ways are needed, too. That’s what we owe the next seven generations – not putting out the same bullshit out over and over again. Looking back what will they say? Maybe, if we aren’t willing to do what is needed, the history told will be that we didn’t use our Precious Knowledge, instead we became bullshit artists and nothing changed … nothing changed at all.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on January 20, 2013 in Tucson movement

 

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